Monthly News Article for September 2019

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

How to Prevent Bullying in Schools

While some may prefer punishing students who bully, and others think that just improving school climate is the answer, a recent survey finds another factor that may help curb bullying: A sense of belonging. 

"The more a child feels like they can connect with their family, their peers, and their school, the less likely they are to engage in bullying behavior," said Christopher Slaten, co-investigator for the survey and professor for the University of Missouri's College of Education.

The researchers surveyed over 900 students from rural communities throughout the United States. It asked students about their perceptions of belonging among their family, their peers, and in their schools. They were asked if they agreed or disagreed with statements such as: "My family members are interested in the same things that I'm interested in," and, "There's a teacher or staff member at my school who accepts me for who I am”. The survey also asked the participants if they like making others upset because it was fun (which is bullying behavior).

The research team found a connection between students' relationships at home, their relationships at school, and bullying behaviors. They found that if students feel like they belong at home, then they're more likely to feel like they belong at school, and this makes them less likely to bully others.

The research also suggests that parents should personally engage with their children to not only help improve relationships at home, but also to help parents know what's really happening at school. One way to do this is to ask specific questions about school. Rather than asking, “How was your day?”, “What did you do in school?” try asking specific questions such as, “Who do you talk to on the bus?”, “Do you sit with the same kids every day?” “Have you ever sat alone?” “Does anyone ever get picked on?” “Has that ever happened to you?” “Who did you play with at recess today?” “Does anyone ever get left out of a game at recess?” These types of questions will help parents to understand whether or not a child is involved in bullying, either as the victim or the perpetrator, or even if they witness bullying a lot at school.

Social skills and communication skills are two of the biggest predictors of bullying involvement, meaning that kids that have really strong social and communication skills are less likely to be involved in bullying. Rather than a stern talk about bad behavior, parents should provide specific praise to improve their child's skills in these areas.

According to research performed by Vanderbilt University, some of the top social and communication skills are: 1) listening to others, 2) taking turns when talking, 3) asking for help, 4) being responsible for your behavior, 5) cooperating, 6) doing nice things for others.

For more information, see the following websites for questions to ask children, how to recognize the signs of bullying, and how to support positive social skills.

http://www.respectu.com/home/how-to-talk-to-your-child-about-bullying-questions-to-ask/

https://www.pacer.org/publications/bullypdf/BP-2.pdf

https://blog.brookespublishing.com/19-tips-on-supporting-positive-behavior-social-skills

https://www.stopbullying.gov

Monthly News Article for August 2019

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

An Outline of the Schools and Districts in Trinity County

You might be surprised to learn that there are nine public school DISTRICTS in Trinity County. A district is defined as an independent school or a collection of schools who are governed by their own School Board and have a Superintendent who manages the district (whereas a Principal is the administrator of just one school in a district).

Read more: Monthly News Article for August 2019

Monthly News Article for July 2019

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

How and why are schools finding mold?

Back in the Winter of 2016, Mountain Valley Unified School District in Hayfork was planning to use special funding (Proposition 39 Clean Energy Jobs Act) to replace old Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) units which had failed in the high school cafeteria. When contractors looked into the old HVAC system, they found mold in ducting and so they were not able to continue work until it was removed. During the Spring of 2017, Burnt Ranch School District wanted to build an additional classroom, and while inspecting to see where the room could be added, mold was discovered in the ceiling. In June of 2019, the presence of mold was reported in a cafeteria at Trinity Alps Unified School District and an inspection was ordered. All of these facilities were built in the 1950s-1960s when building technology was not what it is today.

Read more: Monthly News Article for July 2019

Monthly News Article for June 2019

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Interdistrict Agreements and what it means to live in one district but attend school in another.

As our schools wrap up one school year and prepare for the next, we wanted to take a moment to explain interdistrict agreements and what it means to live in one district but attend school in another. We hope to give you an overview of some of the basic rules and steps involved in navigating this process.

Read more: Monthly News Article for June 2019

Monthly News Article for May 2019

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Trinity County Students Attend the 2019 Youth Empowerment Summit

This was the eighth year that a team of Foster youth and Homeless youth from Trinity County have participated in the annual Youth Empowerment Summit (YES) in Sacramento. The Summit is a hands-on approach for students to learn to become positive change leaders in their communities and leaders on youth issues. They learn about the process of government by understanding how upcoming legislative bills will beneficially impact California’s most vulnerable youth, and they learn how to advocate for the bills being submitted for consideration.

Read more: Monthly News Article for May 2019

Monthly News Article for April 2019

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Computer, Business , and Parent Classes in Trinity County

A group of community members, representatives of the Trinity County Office of Education, and the Trinity Together Cradle to Career Partnership have been working with Shasta College to offer interesting and relevant community courses at the Trinity Campus located at 30 Arbuckle Court in Weaverville, next to the Trinity Alps Performing Arts Center. Now, several classes are offered for the spring semester and there’s still time to sign up!

Read more: Monthly News Article for April 2019

Monthly News Article for March 2019

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

TCOE Provides Support to TAUSD and other Districts

The Trinity County Office of Education (TCOE) provides support for the nine individual school districts in our county, including budget and financial management support. As part of this role, TCOE has been working hand-in-hand with the Trinity Alps Unified School District (TAUSD), which includes Weaverville Elementary, Alps View School and Trinity High School, to work through the $558,000 budget shortfall that the district is currently experiencing.

Read more: Monthly News Article for March 2019

Monthly News Article for February 2019

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

February 2019

The Trinity County Office of Education (TCOE) is a member of the Shasta-Tehama-Trinity Adult Education Consortium which serves all of Trinity County along with Shasta and Tehama Counties.

TCOE, in partnership with our local high school district’s adult education programs, offers services in the following areas:

Read more: Monthly News Article for February 2019

Trinity County Office of Ed | 201 Memorial Drive | PO Box 1256 |  Phone (530) 623-2861 | FAX (530) 623-4489

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