Monthly News Article for August 2020

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

As schools begin to reopen, we are having to adjust expectations from the confusion of our “COVID-Spring”. No one could have guessed that schools would be closed down for more than a couple of weeks last spring, let alone the rest of the 2019-20 school year. We all kept potential opening dates on our calendars, but the plan to reopen schools did not come to fruition throughout the state and in most of the country. 

Now, whether children will be on campus five days a week or doing distance learning each day, the expectation is “school as usual”. Work will be assigned and assignments will be due. All will be graded as normal. Attendance will be monitored, even if it’s from a distance.

A few bad habits may have formed over the last few months, so we thought we’d share some advice to parents from the folks at the Love & Logic Institute:

How to avoid battles over homework

Far too many parents find themselves in un-winnable power-struggles over homework, battles that damage parent-child relationships result in further resistance to learning and they steal joy. There's good news! With some practical tips, we can enjoy cooperative kids while building a life-long love of learning:

Prevent resistance by providing choices within limits. Of course, only give choices that will make you happy regardless of what your child decides. For example: Do you want to work on math first or reading first? Would you like to do the odd problems or the even ones? Would you like to read sitting down or standing up?

When children get resistant, allow them to learn by refusing to. Refusing to do an assignment can serve as a more important life lesson than the content of the assignment. The next time your child gets resistant, experiment with walking away and saying:

I love you too much to fight with you about school work.

I'll be happy to help when I see that you want my help.

Let their grades be their grades. Because there is so much at stake - and because we often feel like our children's grades reflect on our parental abilities - it's tough to stay calm and collected when children earn bad ones. Learning is something that we cannot make another person do. The harder we try, the more they rebel and the more our relationship suffers.

When their grades are poor, be sad for them: "I can't imagine how bad it must feel to get that grade. I love you. Let me know how I can help." or "I bet these grades are really disappointing. Let me know how I can help." Using empathy rather than anger dramatically increases the odds that they'll actually feel bad about getting bad grades.

Build them up in their strengths. Kids who make a lot of mistakes also need to experience plenty of success. That's why it's so important to encourage them to spend time and energy on their strengths. Celebrating their successes cements our relationship and gives them the courage to tackle the tough stuff.

Monthly News Article for June 2020

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Written by the TCOE Team

With all of the hardships COVID-19 has caused, we want to take a moment to acknowledge how well the school districts in Trinity County have changed and adapted to a new way of serving students. It’s been difficult for everyone, but we are ending the school year strong and are proud of the way all of our districts have risen to the challenge to serve our students and communities.

As of this writing, districts in Trinity County have served nearly 100,000 meals to students since schools were closed. They have fed all children in their community, whether or not they are students of their districts. Some districts have delivered meals to children if they had buses or vans to utilize, others have offered “drive through” or “drive up” services. Sometimes the meals were a large box of items to last for several days. Sometimes the meals included toilet paper, hand sanitizer, toothbrushes and other treats. Meal distribution time has always included a chance for staff and students to connect, if only to wave at each other.

Schools have continued instruction for every child each day. The delivery of instruction varied to suit the needs of individual students, classes and communities. Sometimes teachers sent home carefully selected and organized packets of work that were completed and returned; sometimes teachers utilized up-to-date and innovative tools like “Google Classroom” and “Zoom” for meetings with students, and for delivering and collecting assignments online.

With the support of teachers and parents, students have participated in the very first, online art show featuring 207 pieces of art in a student-created presentation for the whole community to enjoy. Students also have had the opportunity to participate in creating projects for the online Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math “STEAM” Fair.  Those project are now available to view online.  

In coordination with Trinity Together, students also had opportunities to attend Career Conversations online and interact with Trinity County alumni in discussions about a wide variety of careers and professional experience ranging from independent entrepreneurs to educators, artists, natural resource professionals and corporate leaders.  

Students with disabilities have also been transitioning to a new way of learning. This includes online resources and lessons for speech therapy, occupational therapy, and mental health needs. Additionally, special education teachers have been working virtually with their general education partners, as well as meeting with one another to collaborate and make distance learning appropriate for students with disabilities. The TCOE special education department has also expanded its resources to include video lessons that parents can watch anytime, as a way to make learning flexible.  For families that don’t have reliable internet access, the same information has been printed out in hard copy form and phone calls have been set up to do regular check-ins. Special education staff have transitioned to distance learning in a way that works for parents, providing multiple options and ways of communication. 

The entire education community of Trinity County has worked hard, learned new ways to serve students, and look forward to seeing everyone in person as soon as it’s safe to do so.

Monthly News Article for May 2020

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Submitted by Steve Hiscock, RISE Academy Teacher with Fabio Robles


Parenting during this time of distance learning can be challenging. There can be lots of obstacles that families may experience. These obstacles might include: homes that are not set up for schooling, students struggling with specific subjects, parents who may not be confident with the material students are working on, and having children in different age groups and grades trying to coordinate their schedules, or the use of a computer. The list goes on and on...  

Read more: Monthly News Article for May 2020

Monthly News Article for April 2020

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Offering Support during COVID-19

Over the past month, many of our daily routines have been changed and we are in the process of adjusting to a new way of doing things. While we are all navigating this current situation together, it can be difficult to know what to do next or how to support our kids. In this article, we hope to offer some ideas and things to consider as we move forward with distance learning and social distancing. 

Be an Example 

Read more: Monthly News Article for April 2020

Monthly News Article for March 2020

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

The R.I.S.E. of a Trauma-Informed School in Trinity County

Trauma-related experiences occur across all racial, economic, and cultural groups yet the way these experiences show up in school, and the way they are responded to, vary greatly. In a national survey of 95,677 children (eighteen years old and younger) from all economic levels and ethnic backgrounds, 46 percent experienced at least one “adverse childhood experience” also referred to as “ACE”. National databases suggest that 26 percent of children in the United States will witness or experience a traumatic event before the age of four. Trauma can occur from a natural disaster, abuse, neglect, or from experiencing or witnessing violence, among other things.

Read more: Monthly News Article for March 2020

Monthly News Article for February 2020

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

How do we prevent a school shooting in Trinity County?

According to a recent report from the US Secret Service in which they reviewed multiple school shootings, there are things that many attackers had in common. The first is that most attackers used firearms, and those firearms were most often acquired from their home or from the home of a relative. In fact, between 70 and 90% of guns used in youth suicide, unintentional shootings and school shootings are acquired from the home or the homes of friends or relatives.

Read more: Monthly News Article for February 2020

Monthly News Article for January 2020

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

While recognizing that suspension or expulsion of students is sometimes necessary, many groups, including educational leaders, are united in the belief that classroom time should be used for student learning and that school discipline should be imposed in a way that does not exclude students from school or limit their opportunity to learn. The reason for this is that studies have shown a relationship between suspending kids from school and serious educational, economic, and social problems, including decreased achievement, increased behavior problems, and increased likelihood of dropping out, use of substance abuse, and involvement with the juvenile justice system. According to Education Code §48900.5 “Suspension… shall be imposed only when other means of correction fail to bring about proper conduct”. 

Suspensions are simply not effective at changing student behavior. 

Read more: Monthly News Article for January 2020

Monthly News Article for December 2019

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

I hate my teacher!

Most of us can look back and remember having quite a few teachers who were fair…and some who were not-so-fair. Each one of them taught us something extremely important about life. The fair ones gave us a sense that life is sometimes fair. The unfair ones gave us wonderful opportunities to develop skills for coping with those times when it isn't. kids need to learn how to succeed with nice teachers as well as demanding ones.

Read more: Monthly News Article for December 2019

Monthly News Article for November 2019

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Title: Help Shape Our Future – Be Counted!

Every 10 years, the U.S. government counts every person living in the U.S. through the census. The census is a short questionnaire that asks basic information about your household and the
people who live in it. Your responses are confidential. The Census Bureau is not allowed to share your individual information with other government agencies, immigration officials, or the public. Strong laws protect your responses from being shared.

Read more: Monthly News Article for November 2019

Trinity County Office of Ed | 201 Memorial Drive | PO Box 1256 |  Phone (530) 623-2861 | FAX (530) 623-4489

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