Monthly News Article for November 2018

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

What is Love and Logic?

Since 2013, The Trinity County Office of Education (TCOE) has been committed to creating a Love and Logic culture in the school districts of Trinity County. We have provided trainings to educators as well as community members, and we are now offering parenting courses that anyone can attend, free of charge. Keep reading!

Love and Logic is a philosophy founded in 1977, and has proven to be a successful approach to parenting (and teaching) children. The “Love” in Love and Logic means that we love our kids so much that we are willing to set and enforce limits, and that we do so with compassion and empathy. The ‘Logic” happens when we allow children to make decisions and affordable mistakes, and let them experience the natural or logical consequences of their actions which are balanced with empathy – and, of course, with safety in mind.

In Love and Logic classes, parents learn that: Adults can set firm limits in loving ways without anger, lecture, threats or repeated warnings, and that one way to set those limits is by using “enforceable statements”. Parents learn to regard children’s mistakes as learning opportunities, and resist the temptation to nag. In these classes, parents also learn to hand problems back to children in loving ways when children misbehave, giving kids the gift of owning and solving their own problems. The classes also explain that it’s ok for parents to delay consequences for a better, more well-thought-out response.

Love and Logic is built around the important foundation of creating caring and respectful relationships and includes the following tenets:

  • Respect, appreciation and love prevents potential problems
    When children feel respected, appreciated and loved by their parents and teachers, they are far more motivated and cause far fewer problems. 

 

  • Freedom to problem-solve and make decisions fosters motivation
    Students are far calmer and more motivated when their parents and teachers allow them to make choices and solve their own problems within limits. 

 

  • Focusing energy on problem prevention is rewarding
    Successful parents and educators focus most of their energy on simple tools for preventing misbehavior or keeping it small...rather than trying to provide consequences for every problem.

 

  • Showing empathy and compassion is effective
    When consequences are necessary, effective parents and educators provide children with sincere empathy or compassion. 

Parents who have participated in the training have said:

“…I rave about the fact that it has helped me develop usable, practical skills, as opposed to just learning another theory about what I should be doing."

“Parenting is fun…[it’s] not simply something to be endured.”

“It’s so much easier to not get into power struggles and arguments now that I know the way to do it. I feel a lot more calm about discipline.”

“[I’ve learned] How to control myself, not my child. I react differently now and so does he.”

If you’re interested in participating in Love and Logic Parenting classes, or know someone who could benefit from them, contact Cassie Telles at TCOE at 530-623-2961 x 254 for more information.

Monthly News Article for September 2018

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Native American Day: A Tribal Villages Celebration

September 28, 2018

Lowden Park, Weaverville, Trinity County, Ca

In 1998, a team of Trinity County teachers attended a three-day Institute sponsored by Humboldt State University Indian Teacher and Educational Personnel Program (ITEPP).  These individuals worked cooperatively with the Trinity County Indian Education Committee to organize a Native American Day: A Tribal Villages Celebration that reflects the identities and values of the American Indian people of Trinity County.  Successful Native American Days have been held annually for the past twenty years.

Read more: Monthly News Article for September 2018

Monthly News Article for October 2018

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Why are Free and Reduced-Price Lunch Applications Important?

There are two reasons why completing these applications for your child/ren’s school is important. One reason is the more obvious one: your child/ren may qualify for breakfast as well as lunch free of charge, or you may only have to pay a reduced amount. Meals at school can insure that all students get nutritious food each day. Research indicates that kids who eat regular, healthy meals will do better in school than those who do not. Also, we all know how hard mornings can be getting kids ready for school. Being able to take “pack a lunch” off the list in the morning can be convenient. You may be surprised to learn that the majority of students at every school in our county is eligible to receive either a free or a reduced-price lunch.

Read more: Monthly News Article for October 2018

Monthly News Article for December 2018

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

What is the California School Dashboard?

The California School Dashboard provides parents and educators with meaningful information on school and district progress so they can participate in decisions to improve student learning.  This year, the Dashboard was released to the public on December 6, 2018 and can be found at http://caschooldashboard.org.  The Dashboard is the new state accountability system that meets the requirements of the newer Federal system called “Every Student Succeeds Act”, or ESSA. There is no more “No Child Left Behind”, or NCLB.

As part of the state’s education plan, the California Department of Education holds all schools accountable for the following:

Academic performance is determined through a test taken annually by students in grades 3-8 and grade 11 in both English Language Arts and Mathematics, and by college and career indicators.

Academic Engagement shows how well schools are engaging students in their learning and measures chronic absenteeism, and graduation rate.

Conditions and Climate shows how well schools are providing a healthy, safe and welcoming environment by measuring suspension rates.

Each area is measured in two ways:  Status and Change.  “Status” indicates the most recent year’s data, while “Change” indicates how a school district has either increased or decreased from the previous year.  Both measures are used to classify each area of accountability with a color.  The colors, in order of low to high, are red, orange, yellow, green, and blue.  All schools are directed by the California Department of Education to attain green in each category within the next six years.

Each of the above areas hold school districts accountable for measuring all students as well as each “significant subgroup” within a school district.  A student group becomes a significant subgroup if the total number of students in a category is 30 or more.  The following subgroups are measured on the Dashboard:  Asian, American Indian, African American, English Learners, Foster Youth, Hispanic, Homeless, Two or More Races, Pacific Islander, students with disabilities, socioeconomically disadvantaged, and White.  There may be more subgroups identified based on an individual school district’s student population.

The Dashboard was revamped this year based on the public’s feedback of the previous year’s template.  It has been changed for accessibility and ease of understanding to allow as much transparency as possible between school districts and their individual stakeholders.

For more information, please contact Tim Nordstrom, Educational Services Director, Trinity County Office of Education at tnordstrom [AT] tcoek12 [DOT] org

Montlhy News Article for August 2018

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 
Helping Your Child Recover from Trauma

Children may be experiencing distress related to events associated with the recent fires. The most important thing you can do in times of trauma is to help your child feel safe and protected. This is the first step in the recovery process. Your presence is probably the single most important factor in helping a child recover in a healthy way from a disturbing event.

“Trauma” is what the person experiences inside, so one child may be experiencing traumatic stress while another child may not. Adults should carefully watch for behavioral changes that can provide clues into what the child is experiencing. There are lists of possible symptoms to watch for online, but here are a few:

Read more: Montlhy News Article for August 2018

Monthly News Article for August

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

This is the first time for our new column. Each month we will publish what we hope is interesting and useful information about the role of our office, the services we provide, and about education topics in general - especially as they pertain to Trinity County. This month the report below is from our school nursing department on requirements for student admission to schools. Because our schools do not have the funding to support their own school nurses, we provide nursing services to all districts in our county.

Read more: Monthly News Article for August

Monthly News Article for March

 

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 
What is the YAS?

Each year our office sponsors the annual Young Artists Showcase (YAS). YAS encourages youth from around Trinity County to express their artistic creativity through original artwork.  This event is a public juried, all-media exhibition of artwork, created by Kindergarten through high school students. YAS is the longest running annual student art exhibition in Trinity County and has supported artistically-inclined students for over 35 years.

This year YAS is scheduled for the month of April 2018. The show opening will be Saturday evening, April 7th at the Highland Art Center in Weaverville. Even during these past few years of economic hardship, we are thankful to be able to continue this event, showcasing artwork from Kindergarten through high school students from all the schools in Trinity County.  Even though many schools are no longer able to afford art teachers, classroom teachers are taking on this challenge and are teaching art within their classrooms.

We know that showcasing creativity in our students is not only an important step in allowing a way for students to express themselves, but according to a report by the Americans for the Arts, young people who participate regularly in the arts (three hours a day, three days each week, through one full year) are four times more likely to be recognized for academic achievement.  The arts are important in developing fine motor skills, promoting confidence, and teaching visual-spatial skills.  According to the George Lucas Educational Foundation and Edutopia, involvement in the arts is also associated with gains in math, reading, cognitive skills, critical thinking and verbal skills. Dr. Kerry Freedman, Head of Art and Design Education at Northern Illinois University states, “Children need to know more about the world than what they can learn through text and numbers.  Arts education teaches students how to interpret, criticize, and use visual information, and how to make choices based on it.”

We invite you to join us throughout the month of April as we celebrate and showcase the students of Trinity County at the Highland Art Center.  For more information, please visit www.tcoek12.org.


 

Monthly News Article for February

 

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Mental Health in California Schools

There is a lot of conversation going on right now about mental health, both nationally and at home in our own community. We wanted to take some time to explain what we do offer in the school setting, who our partners are in serving all of our kids, and clarify a few things to make it easier to get support.

Read more: Monthly News Article for February

Monthly News Article for January 2018

 

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

The Importance of Early Childhood Education

Written by Fabio Robles, Ph.D. - Assistant Superintendent

Studies show that high-quality education early in a child’s life leads to success later in school and at work. Children taught at an early age are able to get along well with others, need little help with learning in school, get better grades, and are able to pay attention longer. Research also shows that young children enrolled in pre-school programs usually graduate from high school, attend college, have fewer behavioral problems, and do not become involved with crime in their teenage and young adult years. 

Read more: Monthly News Article for January 2018

Monthly News Article for December 2017

 

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Written by Anthony Rebelo, Ph.D - Selpa Director / Assistant Superintendent

As we move through the holiday break and into the second half of the school year, we wanted to take a moment to remind everyone how important attendance is in our children’s education. Attendance can sometimes sneak up on us, but consider this fact: A student who misses just two days of school per month would be considered chronically absent or “truant” over the course of a school year. This is important because studies indicate that beginning as early as first grade, students who are chronically absent (missing ten percent of the school year or more which equals just 19 days each year) are much more likely to become high school dropouts.

Read more: Monthly News Article for December 2017

Monthly News Article for November 2017

 

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

In fall 2016, the State Board of Education (SBE) and the California Department of Education (CDE) unveiled the California School Dashboard, a new Web site that provides parents, educators, and the public with important information they can use to review progress in schools and school districts in an easy-to-understand report card format. This dashboard will be updated and released every fall. The 2016 Dashboard is currently available, while the 2017 Dashboard will be available this December. The Dashboard can be found at: https://www.caschooldashboard.org/

Read more: Monthly News Article for November 2017

Trinity County Office of Ed | 201 Memorial Drive | PO Box 1256 |  Phone (530) 623-2861 | FAX (530) 623-4489

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