Monthly News Article for February 2021

logo


Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Trinity County, our schools are open for in-person learning

We are proud to say that our schools are open to in-person instruction, and they all opened at their usual start time this school year, all except for Southern Trinity Joint Unified School District who had a delayed start due to the August Complex Fire.

Safety is a priority for Trinity County districts. Our schools have been following the CDPH Safety Guidelines set out in July 2020, and due to their efforts to enforce those safety plans (masking, social distancing, handwashing, etc.) as well as likely due to the fact that we’ve had fewer cases in our community than in more populated areas, we’ve had no outbreaks in our schools. An outbreak, which would require a school to close to in-person instruction, is defined as “three cases in a school over a 14-day period”.

The only cases we’ve had in our schools have not originated inside the schools themselves, but were due to a close contact with someone in the community who contracted the COVID-19 virus. Some of the schools in our county have had to go to distance-learning for short periods of time for one specific reason: a lack of staff. This has occurred when a staff member or members were required to quarantine due to an exposure, and yet there is an ongoing shortage of substitute teachers to call in. There were also three districts who chose to close to in-person instruction for a short period of time out of an abundance of caution when cases were rising in the population of their respective communities.

Single classrooms or “cohorts” have also gone to distance-learning temporarily because of an exposure to the virus within that group. Our districts have done an exceptional job of keeping groups of students together throughout the day so that if there is an exposure in one classroom, it doesn’t affect other classrooms. This is called “cohorting” or maintaining “stable groups” and has been an effective way to slow any potential spread. Several of our districts, especially, need to be commended because in order to keep cohorts small and socially-distanced, it has meant that their administrator, who may also be Superintendent AND Principal, are now also teaching.

A recent study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that for students, going to school was not directly associated with having a positive COVID-19 test, but social gatherings were—including weddings, parties, and playdates. This likely reflects the more controlled school environment which helps to keep kids healthy.

You may be hearing about the states’ plans for “reopening” schools. That is a misnomer. No school has actually been “closed” in the state this school year. Rather, some students in the state are not learning in-person and instead are engaged in virtual learning. The larger populations in the state have had bigger challenges trying to reopen to in-person instruction and many are still not able to do so. You can now see which schools are open to in-person instruction, those who are doing “hybrid” learning (are taking turns in person at school to keep groupings small) or are distance-learning only at the following website: https://schools.covid19.ca.gov. All schools report in each week, so this website will reflect the latest status of each elementary, middle, high school and charter school.

Suggested section title: “Why are so few children getting COVID-19?”

You might be interested to know that in recent studies evidence suggests that children actually have lower rates of COVID-19 infection than adults and tend to have a less severe reaction if they do get the virus. The reason? Children produce fewer “ACE-2 receptors” and these receptors are the doorway that the virus uses to enter into human cells.

A study from May 2020 shows that elementary students produce fewer “ACE-2 receptors” than middle and high school-aged students, who produce fewer receptors than adults. Consequently, children have fewer doorways into the body for the virus, which leads to fewer infections and less severe infections for those who do catch it.

Another reason may be because children’s immune systems are used to fighting off common colds. The common cold is also in the same family of viruses as COVID-19 called “coronavirus’”. Some parts of all coronavirus’ are very similar. A study of children back in 2011-2018 shows that more children had antibodies against the kinds of coronavirus’ that existed at that time, likely because they had coughs and colds more often than young adults aged 17-25. Those increased antibodies to related virus’ may be keeping more children from getting COVID-19.

It is likely a combination of these two things —the ACE-2 receptor production and pre-existing antibodies to other coronaviruses—that explain why children get COVID-19 less frequently and less severely than adults.

Monthly News Article for January 2021

logo


Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

What do chores at home have to do with school?

Children who understand and follow the procedures and routines of doing chores at home learn how to follow the routines and procedures at school, and this can lead to success at school as well as in life in general. Chores help teach children to follow the complex rules of the road when learning to drive, or the procedures and routines of the workplace when they are old enough to seek employment.

Read more: Monthly News Article for January 2021

Monthly News Article for December 2020

logo


Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Title: Spilling the Beans on COVID-19: A Beginner’s Guide and what all those Terms Mean

As we wind down the first half of the school year and transition into the second half, we wanted to take a moment to review some important terms and phrases you may be hearing all too regularly in relation to COVID-19 and schools. While we are often quick to point out who needs to be in quarantine and who needs to be in isolation, we don’t always pause to explain what those two words mean in our current environment and how we decide who goes into what category. Hopefully, over the next few paragraphs that gets a little clearer for everyone and we can start to understand how these decisions are made.

Read more: Monthly News Article for December 2020

Monthly News Article for November 2020

logo


Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Schools Need Subs in All Job Categories!

Have you ever thought about becoming a substitute teacher, a substitute classroom para-educator (also called a classroom aide), or a pre-school instructor? Maybe you like to cook and would love to try your hand at making a great lunch for kids for a day, or you enjoy working outside and would love to do janitorial or maintenance work on a substitute basis. You’d earn some extra money and our schools really need you!

Our county regularly suffers from a shortage of school substitutes and this year is no exception. It’s possible that people don’t know about this opportunity for extra cash and part-time, flexible work, so we wanted to make sure the community knows and can spread the word!

Read more: Monthly News Article for November 2020

Monthly News Article for September 2020

logo


Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Distance Learning and Special Education by Anthony Rebelo

Welcome back to another school year in Trinity County! As most of our districts are back to school and resuming a normal schedule, there are still so many questions that can pop up. What’s the difference between distance learning and independent study? How does my student get special education services? And what the heck is a “hybrid model” of learning? As we work through these questions together, we appreciate the collaboration and understanding we have seen so far from our school sites and our community. Today, we are going to try and answer one of those questions above…what does special education look like during distance learning?

Read more: Monthly News Article for September 2020

Trinity County Office of Ed | 201 Memorial Drive | PO Box 1256 |  Phone (530) 623-2861 | FAX (530) 623-4489

Copyright © 2013. All Rights Reserved.